Here’s why you’re actually an award-winning badass

I once asked my buddy Brendan to describe me in one word.

His answer: gregarious

Really?

I would’ve never called myself that. I mostly work from home — all alone — for 8+ hours a day. How could he call me a social butterfly?

Explaineth yourself, Brendan!

“Dude, you love being around people. Whenever you pass up the chance to make a new friend, you regret it — and you always make a party much more fun.”

Wow. I pictured myself as someone totally different (a Gollum-like face with a soothing voice like Barry White), but he was right.

But why couldn’t I see my own charming quality?

The weird thing is, most of us are blind our own best qualities

I notice this every time I read a LinkedIn profile. We sell ourselves terribly short. For example, most people skip the “Honors and awards” section of their LinkedIn profile.

Burn this into your brain:

You DO have honors and awards, and you absolutely need to mention it in your profile.

Since most of us don’t think of ourselves as a New York Times award-winning badasses, we assume that we don’t have anything to put in this section. What a bunch of Fabooty!

You don’t have to lie — or include something lame like pee wee baseball medal that you got in the 3rd grade — but I swear, EVERYONE has had a real honor or award that they can include in their profile.

Not only will you be more impressive for it, you’ll also have a complete LinkedIn profile. This is critical. Your complete profile will be 40X more visible in LinkedIn’s search results.

That’s too good to pass up!

Learn what to do here.

-Anton

How to find out if your baby is ugly.

Sometimes, when people setup their LinkedIn profiles, they’re so damn proud of it…  

So attached to it…

So blind to whether it’s actually effective or not…

It’s as if their LinkedIn profile is their new baby.

But what if your baby is ugly?

How’d you find out?  

For starters, 99% of LinkedIn profiles fail the “So What?” test.

If I scanned over your LinkedIn profile, I’d ask myself, “So what?” after each sentence.

You have 20 years experience?

You’re ‘hard working’ and ‘goal oriented’?

Your specialities include Microsoft Excel and Quickbooks?

SO WHAT? What do I get out it? What’s in it for me?

These facts are just random. They’re not telling a story about you as a person. They haven’t build a case for why you’re unique… so I’m gonna tune out.

Think about it  this way:

It’s Monday morning. Jane in HR has already crawled through a minefield of headaches and problems — but she doesn’t feel like doing work yet.

What does she do? She gets on LinkedIn for a few minutes to ‘look busy’.

She stumbles onto your profile, and she’s asking herself a very specific question: “Does this person have what I’M looking for?”

If you want to make a jaw-dropping first impression on LinkedIn, you must answer this question in precise detail. In fact, if I had to boil my whole system down into a sentence, I’d say this:

Your LinkedIn profile must clearly show the world how you will change their lives

Doesn’t that just sound more compelling?

When someone stumbles onto a LinkedIn profile which clearly demonstrates this principle, it’ll give them goosebumps — especially since nobody else knows how to do this.  

Find out how to do it here.

-Anton

Why you don’t need a ‘rocket scientist’s resume’ on LinkedIn

Here’s a fun thought experiment. Who’s the prettiest girl of this bunch?

Exhibit A: 

exibit c

Exhibit B: exhibit b

Exhibit C: exhibit aWho’d you pick?

Guess what?

If you didn’t notice, all of these women are in fact the same person. An article came out last year showing how supermodel Adriana Lima looked totally different with just a few changes to her hair, body language and makeup.

Take a look again to see the truth.

Notice how even though we have the exact same person in these 3 photos, magazines will only print one of them their front cover. Can you guess which one?

Adrianna demonstrates something profound:

People judge a book by its cover, not the pages inside — and you’ve got the power to change how the cover looks!

On LinkedIn, most people think that they need a rocket scientist’s resume to make a good first impression. Not true. Change your words, and you’ll get a completely different response from prospective employers, clients and connections.

You’ll be the exact same person — with the exact same credentials — but you’ll notice the night-and-day difference in the way people respond to you.

You won’t need to go back to school for more education

You won’t need to take years to get more experience

And you’ll be pleasantly surprised to have opportunities coming to you like bees to a honeypot.

I explain exactly how to do this in my program Look Good on LinkedIn. You’ll learn exactly how to make a jaw-dropping first impression with your LinkedIn profile. Get it here.

-Anton

How I solved my ‘money problems’ with LinkedIn

Money problems create a feeling inside of me that I’ve never been able to explain.

… Until now:

11114789_10204344686517607_2062367207_n

 

That’s how I felt just a few years ago — like my bills were about to tear me limb from limb. 

I didn’t have time to wait for the economy turn around. 

I needed to make a change TODAY. 

At that point in my life, I was close to a year out of college, and I had huge loans breathing down my neck. I desperately wanted to find more clients and take my little business to the next level. 

LinkedIn seemed like the best place to find new clients

But when I signed up for LinkedIn, I discovered that most  LinkedIn profiles are terrible (I’ll explain why tomorrow…) 

An unsilenceable inner voice urged me to try a different approach with my LinkedIn profile. I listened to that gut feeling. What happened next shocked and delighted me:

I got one new invitation to connect.

And then another…

And a day later, another…

Every week or two, people would say that they loved my profile — or something to that effect.

Then something else happened. Instead of having to hunt for every last client, some were reaching out to me. My LinkedIn profile became a big part of my client-getting strategy. 

And then here’s my favorite part: 

I even started to get copycats who ripped off my profile!

The first time this happened, I connected with another writer who I admired greatly. When I checked his profile on the following day, I saw that he’d blatantly copied mine!  

That’s how this whole thing started. Eventually I created an entire system for making a jaw-dropping first impression on LinkedIn and getting more exposure. Learn more about it here

-Anton